Category Archives: Lower Shore Land Trust

The Lower Shore Land Trust

chesapeake-bay

Our speaker at our July garden club meeting was Kate Paton, Executive Director of the Lower Shore Land Trust.

The mission of the trust is to preserve rural lands, promote vibrant towns and build a healthier, more connected Eastern Shore. Kate spoke on the environmental benefits of pollinator gardens.   To those ends the trust wants gardeners to work towards a healthy environment for the pollinators in our midst.

They sponsor a Pollinator Certification Program. The criteria for certification are four fold. You must have food sources. That could be native plants, host plants, fruit trees, a feeder and diversity of scent, color and size. Water sources must be present. That could include a pond, river or stream, a birdbath, a hanging drip bottle or a butterfly puddle area. The pollinators also need cover. It may be natural shelter or a constructed shelter, canopy layers and nesting or basking sites. Lastly, certification requires conservation practices – composting, a rain garden , xeriscape, native plants and a reduced lawn area and no fertilizer use. All of these criteria are familiar to gardeners and good suggestions for good stewardship of the land.

beeKate enumerated some reasons why we must take seriously the impact our practices have on the land. Hedgerows are no longer common dividers of our farm fields. The pollinators have a need for that diversity in the landscape. As gardeners, we can help make up for the loss. The Trust has a demonstration garden at their headquarters in Snow Hill. It’s worth a visit.

Since I’ve added native plants to my yard, I’ve seen many more bees, butterflies and birds. By signing up for a pollinator friendly garden, your yard will post a sign that may encourage your neighbors to join in the mission to promote the natural heritage of the Lower Shore.