My Mutant Spruce

dwarf spruce1

 

The lovely dwarf Alberta spruce (Picea glauca ‘Conica’) in my front yard is about 15 years old. It’s neatly shaped with delicate, slow-growing branches. It’s less than five feet tall – just about the size that fits my front yard. It seemed happy growing in its plodding way.

That is until today. Today is when I noticed the strong arm of a large white spruce reaching out from inside the tree.  A giant spruce arm was hiding there. It looked as though it was trying to climb out of its dwarf jailor.

I quickly went to the Internet. “What’s this,” I queried.

Quite common was the answer. The dwarf Alberta spruce is itself a mutation of the white spruce (P. glauca) which has a mature height of 60 feet.  The dwarf mutation was first sighted in Alberta, Canada in 1904 by two botanists waiting for a train at the railway station.  Many foundation plantings later a bud on my tree has reverted back to the original spruce. It’s called a genetic reversion. Expert advice is “nip it in the bud.” Is that where that phrase came from?

Shades of Charles Darwin. What happened to my spruce started me thinking about the capabilities hidden inside all living things – a window on natural selection. I’ll never know if it was stress that made that prickly arm reach out, nor how the phragmites manage to colonize empty spots around my house, nor why the gazania feels the need to fold up its petals at nightfall. It’s mind boggling to think of the wonders in our world.

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