The Vinegar Hit Man

Every year the shore birds do me a favor. They drop poison ivy seeds everywhere in my garden. I’m allergic and I know each time I make contact I’m in for ten days of itching. Just two weeks ago I put on disposable gloves and long sleeves and ripped out a bunch of it. I thought I had taken enough precautions. I use Tecnu  and it’s good at removing the oil. Unfortunately, you have to know where that oil landed. I think it spritzes through the air. I didn’t realize it hit my face. A day later I was swollen and itchy and looking like I’d lost a battle to a vicious foe. I vowed to keep clear of the stuff forevermore. The trouble was, I still needed to get rid of the vile ivy. I thought I’d try a concoction I’d been reading about on the Internet. Here’s the recipe:

1 Gallon white vinegar

2 cups Epsom Salt

¼ cup Dawn liquid detergent

poison ivy 2poison ivy 1

10 AM and 3 PM

Here’s what happened. On this sunny morning the triple-leaved culprit looked lushly green. I doused it with the special mixture. Five hours later the lushness was gone, replaced by dried, crinkled leaves. Now, I didn’t know what was going on under the dirt, but I hoped the roots suffered the same fate as the leaves. Time will tell.

Of course, this mixture must be used with caution.  Any plant you happen to spill it on will sport crispy leaves. So it’s not a solution if the ivy is entwined among the lavender or threading through the daylilies.

The local extension agent suggested I get 20% vinegar. My gallon from the grocery store was only 5%. Just another thing I didn’t know – there is cleaning strength vinegar. If 5% crisped up those leaves in five hours, 20% would surely whack them. Take note – 20% will blister skin and do worse to eyes.

Further research turns up quite a bit of controversy. Some say the vinegar only gets the leaves. Sounds like repeat applications are necessary. The good thing is the vinegar quickly breaks down in the soil, so no problem with planting at the site a week later. And Epsom salts are made of Sulphur and magnesium. Both good for the soil.

In theory gardening conjures visions of relaxation amidst the beauty of nature. Not so for us on the ground. There is battle to be waged with formidable foes – the weeds, the poison ivy, the deer. We must be ever vigilant or that vision will not be our reality.

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